Trujillo dress, yellow chiffon banded collar dress with yellow-white windowpane 4 ply silk skirt, $395 Glasses by Orgreen, $600

Buzzworthy Houston designer David Peck unveiled his spring collection this past weekend with an intimate brunch at his new Montrose showroom and studio. Last fall, Peck moved from a wholesale-only location off Kirby to a combination warehouse/storefront/event space near Westheimer and Woodhead. The new, low-key atmosphere was the perfect compliment to the collection, which includes pret-a-porter pieces in non-nonsense fabrics and dressier items with practical details like pockets and breezy cutouts, perfect for the al fresco weather Houston normally experiences this time of year.

Ocaso gown, sunset red layered chiffon bias cut gown with ruffle sleeve, $2,195

The show was Peck's first at his new studio on Montrose, and a decided contrast from the big shows he unveiled last fall, first at Fashion Houston and then at the newly-opened JW Marriott Downtown, for which he designed the uniforms. For those collections, Peck and his marketing team touted the designer's local status with the slogan “Made HERE.” For his Spring show, Peck shared a bit of the local love he's built up — each outfit was accentuated with chunky jewelry from Houstonian Christina Greene, and designer eyeglasses and sunnies from The Eye Gallery, just across the street from Peck's studio. Even the food was local — prepared by Dig & Serve and featuring Houston-made pasta from Tavola, among other Texas-sourced ingredients.

Early in the show Peck boasted that his team was able to add 30 jobs last year thanks to the move and fall collections. But that doesn't mean the designer, who is originally from New Mexico, has completely forgotten his roots. The Spring collection, he said, was inspired by his grandmother. Pieces were named after towns in New Mexico, and his eveningwear featured neon tones like those seen in a desert sunset. (Fabric with color names like “blood orange” and “daiquiri” added to the brunchy feel of the show.)

In addition to lots of chiffon, the show featured a handful of garments made from limited-edition and one-off fabrics. Peck also designed a small run of clutches made from Aztec woven rugs, similar to one his grandmother carried.

The biggest benefit of having the show at the new Montrose digs? Now that Peck has space for retail, much of the collection is already available for purchase.

 

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