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Image: JoMar Visions

Opposing forces are at work in artist Shae Skidmore’s collective art show, Exposed. After conversations with fellow artists at festivals and art galleries about personal inspirations, he was interested in using the idea of dark versus light. It was clear to Skidmore that everyone had a story and for most artists those stories have ways of manifesting themselves into every work of art.

Skidmore invited 26 artists to reveal their darkest and happiest memories and interpret them onto two 24 x 24-inch canvases. The execution, however, would be a bit more complicated, because this required finding artists willing to become completely vulnerable.

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Artist Shae Skidmore invited 26 artists to participate in his collective show, Exposed.

Image: Shae Skidmore

“I had three or four different artists crying and trying to drop out of the show because they just cant paint these memories. It’s pretty intense,” said Skidmore. “We’re exposing everything that we’re made of, what we draw from and why we’re artists… It’s going to all be laid out on the line, for everybody to see.”

Artists from all over, including Panama and Colorado, have agreed to bare it all on the basis that they are able to use any medium they choose when creating their canvases. For Skidmore and his recruits, this is pure catharsis.

“It was difficult for me—there are literally tears mixed in the paint,” said contributing artists Ann Marie Vancas. “I just went with it and made it a part of the art.”

The exhibition’s setup—two walls, one displaying the darkest life experiences, the other displaying the happiest—accentuates its aim for an emotional and visual balance.

"Expressing my best memory is easy,” added artist Cherie Salinas. "Exposing my worst memory is freeing and fearful all at the same time."

Jan. 29–30. JoMar Visions Studios, 5247 Langfield Rd. 832-474-3116. jomarvisions.com

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