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After Harvey flooded its Houston location, Spaghetti Warehouse says it's not leaving the Bayou City. It is, however, liquidating 92 items in an online auction, which means you can take a little piece of the iconic Italian chain into your own kitchen.

Despite explicit instructions not to mess with Texas, Harvey did just that. Chief among the collateral damage caused by the dastardly storm is, sadly, our own Spaghetti Warehouse–after floodwater inundated the ground floor of the 901 Commerce St. eatery, the iconic Italian chain is selling everything from chandeliers to deep fryers in an online auction.

The chain, which first opened in Dallas in 1972 before expanding to Houston shortly thereafter, shuttered its restaurant here in the wake of the destruction. The location is closed indefinitely, but Spaghetti Warehouse officials are adamant: They're staying in H-Town.

The 92 items for sale on RestaurantEquipment.bid, then, are ones Spaghetti Warehouse won't use in its next location–where, exactly, still remains to be seen–a spokesman told the Houston Business Journal.

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For $115, this decorative trolley sign from Houston's Spaghetti Warehouse could be yours.

You’ll have to wait for your next serving of 15-Layer Lasagne, but in the meantime, you can do two things: 1) Donate to the Houston location's online fundraiser, which seeks $10,000 for the 100-plus local employees who saw Harvey claim their job, home or both, and 2) Bid on a decorative trolley sign or hanging Tiffany lamp for your own dining room.

Bids start at just $1, and the auction runs until 10 a.m. on Thursday, December 14. Just keep in mind that you’re responsible for disconnecting and transporting anything you buy–certain items, like ceiling fans and the aforementioned hanging lamps, instruct buyers to "bring a ladder for removal." And, as the auction site warns (all in title case, inexplicably): “This location sustained flood damage from Hurricane Harvey! Please keep this in mind and bid accordingly!”

If you’re still yearning to bring a little piece of Houston's legendary pasta purveyor into your own home, you’re likely to find a steal on, say, an 83-inch two-door Hobart refrigerator (current bid: $5) or two five-blade ceiling fans ($6).

For a bit more cash–$210–you can even own a giant antique safe originally built for the Melissa State Bank. But, Spaghetti Warehouse advises, be sure to “bring a team to lift.”

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This giant antique safe originally built for Melissa State Bank is currently going for $210 in an online auction.

 

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