Wagyu Katsu Sando | B&B Butchers & Restaurant

Originally a Japanese invention, this sandwich is now one of the most coveted dishes in the world. B&B’s version—the first in Houston—took more than a month’s research and development to perfect. The decadent, meticulously crafted masterpiece features melt-in-your-mouth, panko-crusted, deep-fried A5 wagyu and scratch-made tonkatsu sauce on crustless Japanese milk bread. It rings in at a whopping $120, but it’s worth every penny. Trust us.

Strip Flight | Killen’s Steakhouse

For the New York strip connoisseur, this flight is a must. “We like to view meat in terms of a wine perspective with regard to terroir,” says Graham Laborde, the restaurant’s director of operations. “You get to taste the beef in terms of how it was raised, how it was fed, the breed, marbling.” Currently the flight features wagyu from Marble Ranch in Texas, Cabassi & Co. in Australia, Kagoshima Prefecture in Japan, and RC Ranch in Angleton, along with USDA prime beef. Patrons can choose between having their meat grilled or—as encouraged by Laborde—finished in the broiler after getting a hot sear. “When you sear it on the flat top, the beef fat is rendered,” he says, “giving it that beautiful caramelized crust.”

Texas Long Bone | La Table

Long-bone ribeyes, elsewhere called tomahawks, are popping up all around town, but none is as impressive, or served with as much of a wow factor, as the masterpiece here (see p. 12). Ringing in at 42 ounces, the Akaushi long-bone, sourced from HeartBrand Beef in Flatonia, comes from a red wagyu breed of cattle that originated in Kumamoto, Japan. The beef is marinated for 24 hours in Cognac, then seasoned with thyme and garlic, pan-seared with butter, and finished in the broiler. The final product—wheeled to the table on a silver guéridon, flambéed with Cognac, and carved to order—comes with potato purée and maitake mushrooms. 

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