Every couple of years, Houston rapper Fat Tony drops a new food-centric single that ends up being our summer jam for the season. In 2011, it was "You Ain't Fat," featuring such timeless lines as "skipping collard greens and beans for a Kit-Kat." In 2015, it was "Sushi," a collaboration with Asher Roth culminating in a video that takes the food porn on display in Jiro Dreams of Sushi to a whole different, jiggling, glistening level.

This year, it's "Drive-Thru," the Whataburger-inspired fast food anthem Fat Tony first debuted on Houston Public Media's Skyline Sessions in December 2016. Today, the single hit Spotify. The song's emblem? Naturally, it's the modified "Whatatony" logo the rapper has been selling on T-shirts since last summer.

Within the song, the rapper details his love for Whataburger while name-checking a few other fast-food joints, for better or worse, in various verses:

Where I'm from Whataburger's all we like / Big Mac, I don't even touch that

Damn right I ain't on a diet I eat what I like / But Frenchy's yes please I love that, get a 10-piece

No, I don't eat on Sonic / If I see it I vomit

Don't give a damn 'bout T-Chan's / No matter what's in my wallet / Whataburger gets my profit

Tony's preferred order, we learn from the chorus: "Gonna order me a No. 2 / Whataburger with no mayo / Got a taquito and a big potato / Me and my girl in the drive-thru / And you know I got fries too"—as well as his preferred location, off OST in South Union.

It's no secret the rapper, born Anthony Obi, is a fast-food fan—and, like many Houstonians, has a special affinity for Whataburger. "That new root beer shake at Whataburger got me weak in the knees," he tweeted in June 2015. In December 2016, the rapper hosted a pop-up performance in the parking lot of a local Whataburger at 3 a.m. as part of the Day for Night festivities going on that weekend.

For its part, Whataburger hasn't publicly responded to Fat Tony's love letter, but it's certainly far better publicity for the burger chain than last month's news that its bright orange, plastic order numbers were being used to mark crime scene evidence at a shooting on West Little York.

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