Every week Miranda Enzor, shares all kinds of cutesy and ghostly (but not scary—she doesn’t do horror) content to her blog, Spooky Little Halloween.

Folks in Montrose are used to eclectic characters. Still, some heads do turn when Miranda Enzor passes by. But it’s not her bright pink hair that transfixes people; it’s the Halloween outfits she wears year-round that spur the head spins.

However, Enzor doesn’t mind. “I dress for me,” she says, and the quirky creative loves Halloween.

Every week Enzor, 37, shares all kinds of cutesy and ghostly (but not scary—she doesn’t do horror) content to her blog, Spooky Little Halloween. She posts decorating tips, playlists, shopping recommendations, recipes, funny stories, and ways to inject Halloween into your daily life, like donning a Halloween T-shirt in spring.

But Enzor never expected to become a Halloween influencer. All this hocus-pocus started with a ghoulishly bad Halloween party 13 years ago. Ever since she was a child growing up in Cy-Fair, the decorator has loved the magical escapism of Halloween, like storybooks come to life. Decorating was always a big to-do in her family, as were dressing up—her mother made her first costume, Cheer Bear the Care Bear—and pumpkin carving, which is still Enzor’s favorite activity.

“I just love the squish of pumpkin guts on my fingers,” she says. “That is Halloween to me.”

So when her friend invited her to a Halloween party in 2008 while she was living in Oklahoma, she had high expectations. Hardly anyone showed up, and it was “the lamest Halloween ever.”

The next year, haunted by the specter of that fiasco, she moved back to Houston and hosted a “weenie roast” in her parents’ backyard. It was a blast, she says, but still not quite what she wanted. “I just had this vision of the party in Hocus Pocus,” she says. Over the decade that she threw this bash, she threaded parties with themes like Tim Burton and Monster Mash. She decorated her parents’ home—for Harry Potter, she hung candles from the ceiling—and set a firm but festive tone: no costume, no entry.

After continuing a consistent Halloween life trail, Enzor started her blog in 2015 so she could share photos from her annual parties, but it’s now grown into a hub with more than 30,000 followers on Instagram and her Halloween book club has 4,000 members.

“It is baffling to me most days that basically a small city follows me on social media,” she says.

But that small city has become a tight-knit community. It’s a place where anyone can fit in, she says, be friends, and celebrate Halloween, no matter what’s happening, which is how Enzor got her nickname.

Last year she says people felt like the pandemic ripped away their ability to celebrate Halloween. A follower called her the “Fairy Godmother of Halloween” after Enzor encouraged everyone to have fun together online—she herself held a sleepover via Instagram on October 30.

Enzor leaned into the idea, turning it into a costume: candy corn wings; a yellow, orange, and white tulle skirt; a crown; and, obviously, a wand. But, while the costume was originally meant as a joke, she thinks the moniker gets to the heart of what she’s all about.

“I kind of see myself now visually as I’m publishing blog posts,” she says, “sitting there over the internet waving my candy corn wand like, ‘Hello, internet, here’s your Halloween treat for today.’”

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