Houstonians are no strangers to thrifting. Whether it’s at Goodwill or vintage stores in Montrose, odds are you’ve been more than once. We’re even experienced in online thrifting, and thanks to the pandemic we have plenty of virtual options, like Goodfair.

At first glance, this shop may seem like your typical online thrift store, but there's a tiny twist—you don’t know what you’re going to get.

The Houston-based company sells secondhand (called “preloved”) clothing in bundles. These can be a bundle of the same type of clothing, like a set of four Preloved Printed White T-shirts, or a variety of pieces tied together with a theme, like the Grill Daddy Bundle, CEO Topper Luciani’s favorite. Customers can make requests, but ultimately “the universe decides,” Luciani tells Houstonia.

Why the mystery for these bundles? It’s just good business sense, he explains.

“It just doesn’t make sense to photograph, measure, and describe every single piece,” Luciani says. “Current marketplace models require customers to upload their unique items from their closet. It makes getting inventory more of a challenge.”

Luciani, determined to be part of the solution to the clothing waste crisis, founded the store in 2018 with a name that ensures its customers feel good in their clothes while using fair practices.

Goodfair sources its inventory directly from textile recyclers, saving countless amounts of clothes from landfills (where most donated clothes end up). So, it’s no surprise that Luciani chose Houston—the used-clothing capital of the world—as Goodfair’s home city.

“It opened up a world of supply that didn’t exist before.” Luciani says. “The way to have the most impact as easily as possible was to go directly to the textile exporters.”

As evidenced by its recent partnership with Nordstrom, Goodfair is boldly taking on the role of spreading its message of secondhand shopping. In today’s changing global climate, this message becomes more important every day. But the consumer climate is changing with it. Recent projections show the growing demand for buying secondhand: the resale and thrift industry is expected to be worth $80 billion, up from $28 billion in 2021. The same industry was worth $10 billion 12 years ago.

Luciani says that Goodfair is a pioneer, giving more people access to used clothes than ever before. By selling their clothing in bundles, Goodfair is able to lower its prices, giving the average person access to sustainable fashion. Not everyone can afford traditional sustainable fashion brands, says Luciano, but Goodfair makes sure that everyone can afford a bundle, which range $6–$85 online.

“Shopping secondhand, even if just a small amount, can make a massive difference, if it’s done across a lot of people,” Luciani says. So go pay the website a little visit, because its preloved summer collection just dropped.

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