A woman attends a virtual party.

We all know Houstonians like a good party. Turns out, we like to virtually party too. Online invitation company Evite released its first-ever Party Trend report this week, and you bet Houston virtually partied hard in 2020.

About 85,000 people in Houston were invited to virtual parties this year, and the Bayou City is one of the top eight cities in the U.S. that “partied the most virtually,” according to the report. We share this title with Dallas, New York City, Chicago, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, and Washington, DC.

If you think we can do better than so many other cities, well, you’re right. According to the report, our very own Clutch City won the country’s “Most Anticipated” superlative: One Houston party received 1,200 "yes" RSVPs—wow, we wish we got that invite.

Texas also ranked second for the most car parades and drive-by parties with 10,000 events. California had 19,000, but let’s not talk about that.

The study had some interesting nationwide stats as well. Apparently 6.5 million people in the U.S. have been invited to virtual parties since March, including 780,000 baby showers and 127,000 weddings. 

Also, someone, somewhere in America received 376 party invitations, which left us both awed and wondering, how do you have that many friends? But the study only reported on data collected from January 1 through August 2, so that means Houstonians still have four months to amass 377 virtual invitations.

As for in-person parties, the folks at Evite told us a total of 685,000 people in Houston have been invited to (virtual and otherwise) parties in 2020 so far, in spite of the pandemic. However, according to the study, 42 percent of people would only host an in-person event if they knew every guest had tested negative for Covid-19, and 49 percent of folks would be more comfortable if everyone at a party wore a mask.

As the holidays approach and the pandemic staunchly remains, Evite predicts Trick-or-Treating could look more like an Easter Egg Hunt this Halloween, Thanksgivings could turn into potluck suppers, temperature checks will be the new bouncers, and in-person events will continue to look different.

We also could see New Year’s Eve parties start as early as the fall, because, you know, we’re all pretty much done with 2020.

Read the full report here.

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